salt.modules.aptpkg

Support for APT (Advanced Packaging Tool)

Important

If you feel that Salt should be using this module to manage packages on a minion, and it is using a different module (or gives an error similar to 'pkg.install' is not available), see here.

Note

For virtual package support, either the python-apt or dctrl-tools package must be installed.

For repository management, the python-apt package must be installed.

salt.modules.aptpkg.add_repo_key(path=None, text=None, keyserver=None, keyid=None, saltenv='base')

New in version 2017.7.0.

Add a repo key using apt-key add.

Parameters:
  • path (str) -- The path of the key file to import.
  • text (str) -- The key data to import, in string form.
  • keyserver (str) -- The server to download the repo key specified by the keyid.
  • keyid (str) -- The key id of the repo key to add.
  • saltenv (str) -- The environment the key file resides in.
Returns:

A boolean representing whether the repo key was added.

Return type:

bool

CLI Examples:

salt '*' pkg.add_repo_key 'salt://apt/sources/test.key'

salt '*' pkg.add_repo_key text="'$KEY1'"

salt '*' pkg.add_repo_key keyserver='keyserver.example' keyid='0000AAAA'
salt.modules.aptpkg.autoremove(list_only=False, purge=False)

New in version 2015.5.0.

Remove packages not required by another package using apt-get autoremove.

list_only
: False
Only retrieve the list of packages to be auto-removed, do not actually perform the auto-removal.
purge
: False

Also remove package config data when autoremoving packages.

New in version 2015.8.0.

CLI Example:

salt '*' pkg.autoremove
salt '*' pkg.autoremove list_only=True
salt '*' pkg.autoremove purge=True
salt.modules.aptpkg.del_repo(repo, **kwargs)

Delete a repo from the sources.list / sources.list.d

If the .list file is in the sources.list.d directory and the file that the repo exists in does not contain any other repo configuration, the file itself will be deleted.

The repo passed in must be a fully formed repository definition string.

CLI Examples:

salt '*' pkg.del_repo "myrepo definition"
salt.modules.aptpkg.del_repo_key(name=None, **kwargs)

New in version 2015.8.0.

Remove a repo key using apt-key del

name
Repo from which to remove the key. Unnecessary if keyid is passed.
keyid
The KeyID of the GPG key to remove
keyid_ppa
: False

If set to True, the repo's GPG key ID will be looked up from ppa.launchpad.net and removed.

Note

Setting this option to True requires that the name param also be passed.

CLI Examples:

salt '*' pkg.del_repo_key keyid=0123ABCD
salt '*' pkg.del_repo_key name='ppa:foo/bar' keyid_ppa=True
salt.modules.aptpkg.expand_repo_def(**kwargs)

Take a repository definition and expand it to the full pkg repository dict that can be used for comparison. This is a helper function to make the Debian/Ubuntu apt sources sane for comparison in the pkgrepo states.

This is designed to be called from pkgrepo states and will have little use being called on the CLI.

salt.modules.aptpkg.file_dict(*packages)

List the files that belong to a package, grouped by package. Not specifying any packages will return a list of _every_ file on the system's package database (not generally recommended).

CLI Examples:

salt '*' pkg.file_dict httpd
salt '*' pkg.file_dict httpd postfix
salt '*' pkg.file_dict
salt.modules.aptpkg.file_list(*packages)

List the files that belong to a package. Not specifying any packages will return a list of _every_ file on the system's package database (not generally recommended).

CLI Examples:

salt '*' pkg.file_list httpd
salt '*' pkg.file_list httpd postfix
salt '*' pkg.file_list
salt.modules.aptpkg.get_repo(repo, **kwargs)

Display a repo from the sources.list / sources.list.d

The repo passed in needs to be a complete repo entry.

CLI Examples:

salt '*' pkg.get_repo "myrepo definition"
salt.modules.aptpkg.get_repo_keys()

New in version 2017.7.0.

List known repo key details.

Returns:A dictionary containing the repo keys.
Return type:dict

CLI Examples:

salt '*' pkg.get_repo_keys
salt.modules.aptpkg.get_selections(pattern=None, state=None)

View package state from the dpkg database.

Returns a dict of dicts containing the state, and package names:

{'<host>':
    {'<state>': ['pkg1',
                 ...
                ]
    },
    ...
}

CLI Example:

salt '*' pkg.get_selections
salt '*' pkg.get_selections 'python-*'
salt '*' pkg.get_selections state=hold
salt '*' pkg.get_selections 'openssh*' state=hold
salt.modules.aptpkg.hold(name=None, pkgs=None, sources=None, **kwargs)

New in version 2014.7.0.

Set package in 'hold' state, meaning it will not be upgraded.

name

The name of the package, e.g., 'tmux'

CLI Example:

salt '*' pkg.hold <package name>
pkgs

A list of packages to hold. Must be passed as a python list.

CLI Example:

salt '*' pkg.hold pkgs='["foo", "bar"]'
salt.modules.aptpkg.info_installed(*names, **kwargs)

Return the information of the named package(s) installed on the system.

New in version 2015.8.1.

names
The names of the packages for which to return information.
failhard

Whether to throw an exception if none of the packages are installed. Defaults to True.

New in version 2016.11.3.

CLI example:

salt '*' pkg.info_installed <package1>
salt '*' pkg.info_installed <package1> <package2> <package3> ...
salt '*' pkg.info_installed <package1> failhard=false
salt.modules.aptpkg.install(name=None, refresh=False, fromrepo=None, skip_verify=False, debconf=None, pkgs=None, sources=None, reinstall=False, ignore_epoch=False, **kwargs)

Changed in version 2015.8.12,2016.3.3,2016.11.0: On minions running systemd>=205, systemd-run(1) is now used to isolate commands which modify installed packages from the salt-minion daemon's control group. This is done to keep systemd from killing any apt-get/dpkg commands spawned by Salt when the salt-minion service is restarted. (see KillMode in the systemd.kill(5) manpage for more information). If desired, usage of systemd-run(1) can be suppressed by setting a config option called systemd.scope, with a value of False (no quotes).

Install the passed package, add refresh=True to update the dpkg database.

name

The name of the package to be installed. Note that this parameter is ignored if either "pkgs" or "sources" is passed. Additionally, please note that this option can only be used to install packages from a software repository. To install a package file manually, use the "sources" option.

32-bit packages can be installed on 64-bit systems by appending the architecture designation (:i386, etc.) to the end of the package name.

CLI Example:

salt '*' pkg.install <package name>
refresh
Whether or not to refresh the package database before installing.

cache_valid_time

New in version 2016.11.0.

Skip refreshing the package database if refresh has already occurred within <value> seconds

fromrepo
Specify a package repository to install from (e.g., apt-get -t unstable install somepackage)
skip_verify
Skip the GPG verification check (e.g., --allow-unauthenticated, or --force-bad-verify for install from package file).
debconf
Provide the path to a debconf answers file, processed before installation.
version

Install a specific version of the package, e.g. 1.2.3~0ubuntu0. Ignored if "pkgs" or "sources" is passed.

Changed in version Oxygen: version can now contain comparison operators (e.g. >1.2.3, <=2.0, etc.)

reinstall
: False

Specifying reinstall=True will use apt-get install --reinstall rather than simply apt-get install for requested packages that are already installed.

If a version is specified with the requested package, then apt-get install --reinstall will only be used if the installed version matches the requested version.

New in version 2015.8.0.

ignore_epoch
: False

Only used when the version of a package is specified using a comparison operator (e.g. >4.1). If set to True, then the epoch will be ignored when comparing the currently-installed version to the desired version.

New in version Oxygen.

Multiple Package Installation Options:

pkgs

A list of packages to install from a software repository. Must be passed as a python list.

CLI Example:

salt '*' pkg.install pkgs='["foo", "bar"]'
salt '*' pkg.install pkgs='["foo", {"bar": "1.2.3-0ubuntu0"}]'
sources

A list of DEB packages to install. Must be passed as a list of dicts, with the keys being package names, and the values being the source URI or local path to the package. Dependencies are automatically resolved and marked as auto-installed.

32-bit packages can be installed on 64-bit systems by appending the architecture designation (:i386, etc.) to the end of the package name.

Changed in version 2014.7.0.

CLI Example:

salt '*' pkg.install sources='[{"foo": "salt://foo.deb"},{"bar": "salt://bar.deb"}]'
force_yes

Passes --force-yes to the apt-get command. Don't use this unless you know what you're doing.

New in version 0.17.4.

install_recommends

Whether to install the packages marked as recommended. Default is True.

New in version 2015.5.0.

only_upgrade

Only upgrade the packages, if they are already installed. Default is False.

New in version 2015.5.0.

force_conf_new

Always install the new version of any configuration files.

New in version 2015.8.0.

Returns a dict containing the new package names and versions:

{'<package>': {'old': '<old-version>',
               'new': '<new-version>'}}
salt.modules.aptpkg.latest_version(*names, **kwargs)

Return the latest version of the named package available for upgrade or installation. If more than one package name is specified, a dict of name/version pairs is returned.

If the latest version of a given package is already installed, an empty string will be returned for that package.

A specific repo can be requested using the fromrepo keyword argument.

cache_valid_time

New in version 2016.11.0.

Skip refreshing the package database if refresh has already occurred within <value> seconds

CLI Example:

salt '*' pkg.latest_version <package name>
salt '*' pkg.latest_version <package name> fromrepo=unstable
salt '*' pkg.latest_version <package1> <package2> <package3> ...
salt.modules.aptpkg.list_pkgs(versions_as_list=False, removed=False, purge_desired=False, **kwargs)

List the packages currently installed in a dict:

{'<package_name>': '<version>'}
removed
If True, then only packages which have been removed (but not purged) will be returned.
purge_desired

If True, then only packages which have been marked to be purged, but can't be purged due to their status as dependencies for other installed packages, will be returned. Note that these packages will appear in installed

Changed in version 2014.1.1: Packages in this state now correctly show up in the output of this function.

Note

External dependencies

Virtual package resolution requires the dctrl-tools package to be installed. Virtual packages will show a version of 1.

CLI Example:

salt '*' pkg.list_pkgs
salt '*' pkg.list_pkgs versions_as_list=True
salt.modules.aptpkg.list_repo_pkgs(*args, **kwargs)

New in version 2017.7.0.

Returns all available packages. Optionally, package names (and name globs) can be passed and the results will be filtered to packages matching those names.

This function can be helpful in discovering the version or repo to specify in a pkg.installed state.

The return data will be a dictionary mapping package names to a list of version numbers, ordered from newest to oldest. For example:

{
    'bash': ['4.3-14ubuntu1.1',
             '4.3-14ubuntu1'],
    'nginx': ['1.10.0-0ubuntu0.16.04.4',
              '1.9.15-0ubuntu1']
}

CLI Examples:

salt '*' pkg.list_repo_pkgs
salt '*' pkg.list_repo_pkgs foo bar baz
salt.modules.aptpkg.list_repos()

Lists all repos in the sources.list (and sources.lists.d) files

CLI Example:

salt '*' pkg.list_repos
salt '*' pkg.list_repos disabled=True
salt.modules.aptpkg.list_upgrades(refresh=True, dist_upgrade=True, **kwargs)

List all available package upgrades.

refresh
Whether to refresh the package database before listing upgrades. Default: True.

cache_valid_time

New in version 2016.11.0.

Skip refreshing the package database if refresh has already occurred within <value> seconds

dist_upgrade
Whether to list the upgrades using dist-upgrade vs upgrade. Default is to use dist-upgrade.

CLI Example:

salt '*' pkg.list_upgrades
salt.modules.aptpkg.mod_repo(repo, saltenv='base', **kwargs)

Modify one or more values for a repo. If the repo does not exist, it will be created, so long as the definition is well formed. For Ubuntu the ppa:<project>/repo format is acceptable. ppa: format can only be used to create a new repository.

The following options are available to modify a repo definition:

architectures
A comma-separated list of supported architectures, e.g. amd64 If this option is not set, all architectures (configured in the system) will be used.
comps
A comma separated list of components for the repo, e.g. main
file
A file name to be used
keyserver
Keyserver to get gpg key from
keyid
Key ID to load with the keyserver argument
key_url
URL to a GPG key to add to the APT GPG keyring
key_text

GPG key in string form to add to the APT GPG keyring

New in version Oxygen.

consolidate
: False
If True, will attempt to de-duplicate and consolidate sources
comments

Sometimes you want to supply additional information, but not as enabled configuration. All comments provided here will be joined into a single string and appended to the repo configuration with a comment marker (#) before it.

New in version 2015.8.9.

Note

Due to the way keys are stored for APT, there is a known issue where the key won't be updated unless another change is made at the same time. Keys should be properly added on initial configuration.

CLI Examples:

salt '*' pkg.mod_repo 'myrepo definition' uri=http://new/uri
salt '*' pkg.mod_repo 'myrepo definition' comps=main,universe
salt.modules.aptpkg.owner(*paths)

New in version 2014.7.0.

Return the name of the package that owns the file. Multiple file paths can be passed. Like pkg.version, if a single path is passed, a string will be returned, and if multiple paths are passed, a dictionary of file/package name pairs will be returned.

If the file is not owned by a package, or is not present on the minion, then an empty string will be returned for that path.

CLI Example:

salt '*' pkg.owner /usr/bin/apachectl
salt '*' pkg.owner /usr/bin/apachectl /usr/bin/basename
salt.modules.aptpkg.purge(name=None, pkgs=None, **kwargs)

Changed in version 2015.8.12,2016.3.3,2016.11.0: On minions running systemd>=205, systemd-run(1) is now used to isolate commands which modify installed packages from the salt-minion daemon's control group. This is done to keep systemd from killing any apt-get/dpkg commands spawned by Salt when the salt-minion service is restarted. (see KillMode in the systemd.kill(5) manpage for more information). If desired, usage of systemd-run(1) can be suppressed by setting a config option called systemd.scope, with a value of False (no quotes).

Remove packages via apt-get purge along with all configuration files.

name
The name of the package to be deleted.

Multiple Package Options:

pkgs
A list of packages to delete. Must be passed as a python list. The name parameter will be ignored if this option is passed.

New in version 0.16.0.

Returns a dict containing the changes.

CLI Example:

salt '*' pkg.purge <package name>
salt '*' pkg.purge <package1>,<package2>,<package3>
salt '*' pkg.purge pkgs='["foo", "bar"]'
salt.modules.aptpkg.refresh_db(cache_valid_time=0, failhard=False)

Updates the APT database to latest packages based upon repositories

Returns a dict, with the keys being package databases and the values being the result of the update attempt. Values can be one of the following:

  • True: Database updated successfully
  • False: Problem updating database
  • None: Database already up-to-date

cache_valid_time

New in version 2016.11.0.

Skip refreshing the package database if refresh has already occurred within <value> seconds

failhard

If False, return results of Err lines as False for the package database that encountered the error. If True, raise an error with a list of the package databases that encountered errors.

CLI Example:

salt '*' pkg.refresh_db
salt.modules.aptpkg.remove(name=None, pkgs=None, **kwargs)

Changed in version 2015.8.12,2016.3.3,2016.11.0: On minions running systemd>=205, systemd-run(1) is now used to isolate commands which modify installed packages from the salt-minion daemon's control group. This is done to keep systemd from killing any apt-get/dpkg commands spawned by Salt when the salt-minion service is restarted. (see KillMode in the systemd.kill(5) manpage for more information). If desired, usage of systemd-run(1) can be suppressed by setting a config option called systemd.scope, with a value of False (no quotes).

Remove packages using apt-get remove.

name
The name of the package to be deleted.

Multiple Package Options:

pkgs
A list of packages to delete. Must be passed as a python list. The name parameter will be ignored if this option is passed.

New in version 0.16.0.

Returns a dict containing the changes.

CLI Example:

salt '*' pkg.remove <package name>
salt '*' pkg.remove <package1>,<package2>,<package3>
salt '*' pkg.remove pkgs='["foo", "bar"]'
salt.modules.aptpkg.set_selections(path=None, selection=None, clear=False, saltenv='base')

Change package state in the dpkg database.

The state can be any one of, documented in dpkg(1):

  • install
  • hold
  • deinstall
  • purge

This command is commonly used to mark specific packages to be held from being upgraded, that is, to be kept at a certain version. When a state is changed to anything but being held, then it is typically followed by apt-get -u dselect-upgrade.

Note: Be careful with the clear argument, since it will start with setting all packages to deinstall state.

Returns a dict of dicts containing the package names, and the new and old versions:

{'<host>':
    {'<package>': {'new': '<new-state>',
                   'old': '<old-state>'}
    },
    ...
}

CLI Example:

salt '*' pkg.set_selections selection='{"install": ["netcat"]}'
salt '*' pkg.set_selections selection='{"hold": ["openssh-server", "openssh-client"]}'
salt '*' pkg.set_selections salt://path/to/file
salt '*' pkg.set_selections salt://path/to/file clear=True
salt.modules.aptpkg.unhold(name=None, pkgs=None, sources=None, **kwargs)

New in version 2014.7.0.

Set package current in 'hold' state to install state, meaning it will be upgraded.

name

The name of the package, e.g., 'tmux'

CLI Example:

salt '*' pkg.unhold <package name>
pkgs

A list of packages to hold. Must be passed as a python list.

CLI Example:

salt '*' pkg.unhold pkgs='["foo", "bar"]'
salt.modules.aptpkg.upgrade(refresh=True, dist_upgrade=False, **kwargs)

Changed in version 2015.8.12,2016.3.3,2016.11.0: On minions running systemd>=205, systemd-run(1) is now used to isolate commands which modify installed packages from the salt-minion daemon's control group. This is done to keep systemd from killing any apt-get/dpkg commands spawned by Salt when the salt-minion service is restarted. (see KillMode in the systemd.kill(5) manpage for more information). If desired, usage of systemd-run(1) can be suppressed by setting a config option called systemd.scope, with a value of False (no quotes).

Upgrades all packages via apt-get upgrade or apt-get dist-upgrade if dist_upgrade is True.

Returns a dictionary containing the changes:

{'<package>':  {'old': '<old-version>',
                'new': '<new-version>'}}
dist_upgrade

Whether to perform the upgrade using dist-upgrade vs upgrade. Default is to use upgrade.

New in version 2014.7.0.

cache_valid_time

New in version 2016.11.0.

Skip refreshing the package database if refresh has already occurred within <value> seconds

download_only

Only donwload the packages, don't unpack or install them

New in version Oxygen.

force_conf_new

Always install the new version of any configuration files.

New in version 2015.8.0.

CLI Example:

salt '*' pkg.upgrade
salt.modules.aptpkg.upgrade_available(name)

Check whether or not an upgrade is available for a given package

CLI Example:

salt '*' pkg.upgrade_available <package name>
salt.modules.aptpkg.version(*names, **kwargs)

Returns a string representing the package version or an empty string if not installed. If more than one package name is specified, a dict of name/version pairs is returned.

CLI Example:

salt '*' pkg.version <package name>
salt '*' pkg.version <package1> <package2> <package3> ...
salt.modules.aptpkg.version_cmp(pkg1, pkg2, ignore_epoch=False)

Do a cmp-style comparison on two packages. Return -1 if pkg1 < pkg2, 0 if pkg1 == pkg2, and 1 if pkg1 > pkg2. Return None if there was a problem making the comparison.

ignore_epoch
: False

Set to True to ignore the epoch when comparing versions

New in version 2015.8.10,2016.3.2.

CLI Example:

salt '*' pkg.version_cmp '0.2.4-0ubuntu1' '0.2.4.1-0ubuntu1'