Salt 2019.2.0 Release Notes - Codename Fluorine

Python 2.7 Deprecation

In light of Python 2.7 reaching its End of Life (EOL) on Jan 1st 2020, Python 2 will be deprecated from SaltStack no earlier than the Sodium release, that is either the Sodium release or a later release. This decision is pending further community discussion.

Known Issues

The following are known issues for the 2019.2.0 release and will be fixed for 2019.2.1:

Non-Backward-Compatible Change to YAML Renderer

In earlier releases, this was considered valid usage in Python 2, assuming that data was a list or dictionary containing keys/values which are unicode types:

/etc/foo.conf:
  file.managed:
    - source: salt://foo.conf.jinja
    - template: jinja
    - context:
        data: {{ data }}

One common use case for this is when using one of Salt's custom Jinja filters which return lists or dictionaries, such as the ipv4 filter.

In Python 2, Jinja will render the unicode string types within the list/dictionary with the "u" prefix (e.g. {u'foo': u'bar'}). While not valid YAML, earlier releases would successfully load these values.

As of this release, the above SLS would result in an error message. To allow for a data structure to be dumped directly into your SLS file, use the tojson Jinja filter:

/etc/foo.conf:
  file.managed:
    - source: salt://foo.conf.jinja
    - template: jinja
    - context:
        data: {{ data|tojson }}

Another example where the new filter needs to be used is the following state example:

grafana_packages:
  pkg.installed:
  - names: {{ server.pkgs }}

This will fail when pkgs is a list or dictionary. You will need to update the state:

grafana_packages:
  pkg.installed:
  - names: {{ server.pkgs|tojson }}

This test case has also been tested with the yaml and json filters successfully.

Note

This filter was added in Jinja 2.9. However, fear not! The 2018.3.3 release added a tojson filter which will be used if this filter is not already present, making it available on platforms like RHEL 7 and Ubuntu 14.04 which provide older versions of Jinja.

Important

The json_encode_dict and json_encode_list filters do not actually dump the results to JSON. Since tojson accomplishes what those filters were designed to do, they are now deprecated and will be removed in the Neon release. The tojson filter should be used in all cases where json_encode_dict and json_encode_list would have been used.

Ansible Playbook State and Execution Modules

Along with the including the ansible modules in the Oxygen release, running playbooks has been added in 2019.2.0 with the playbooks function. This also includes an ansible playbooks state module which can be used on a targeted host to run ansible playbooks, or used in an orchestration state runner.

install nginx:
  ansible.playbooks:
    - name: install.yml
    - git_repo: git://github.com/gtmanfred/playbook.git
    - git_kwargs:
        rev: master

The playbooks modules also includes the ability to specify a git repo to clone and use, or a specific directory can to used when running the playbook.

Network Automation

Beginning with this release, Salt provides much broader support for a variety of network operating systems, and features for configuration manipulation or operational command execution.

Netmiko

Netmiko, the multi-vendor library to simplify Paramiko SSH connections to network devices, is now officially integrated into Salt. The network community can use it via the netmiko Proxy Module or directly from any Salt Minions, passing the connection credentials - see the documentation for the netmiko Execution Module.

Arista

Arista switches can now be managed running under the pyeapi Proxy Module, and execute RPC requests via the pyeapi Execution Module.

Cisco Nexus

While support for SSH-based operations has been added in the release codename Carbon (2016.11), the new nxos_api Proxy Module and nxos_api allow management of Cisco Nexus switches via the NX-API.

It is important to note that these modules don't have third party dependencies, therefore they can be used straight away from any Salt Minion. This also means that the user may be able to install the regular Salt Minion on the Nexus switch directly and manage the network devices like a regular server.

General-purpose Modules

The new ciscoconfparse Execution Module can be used for basic configuration parsing, audit or validation for a variety of network platforms having Cisco IOS style configuration (one space indentation), as well as brace-delimited configuration style.

The iosconfig can be used for various configuration manipulation for Cisco IOS style configuration, such as: configuration cleanup, tree representation of the config, etc.

NAPALM

Commit At and Commit Confirmed

Beginning with this release, NAPALM users are able to execute scheduled commits (broadly known as "commit at") and "commit confirmed" (revert the configuration change unless the user confirms by running another command). These features are available via the commit_in, commit_at, revert_in, or revert_at arguments for the net.load_config and net.load_template execution functions, or netconfig.managed.

The counterpart execution functions net.confirm_commit, or net.cancel_commit, as well as the State functions netconfig.commit_cancelled, or netconfig.commit_confirmed can be used to confirm or cancel a commit.

Please note that the commit confirmed and commit cancelled functionalities are available for any platform whether the network devices supports the features natively or not. However, be cautious and make sure you read and understand the caveats before using them in production.

Multiple Templates Rendered Simultaneously

The template_name argument of the net.load_template Execution and netconfig.managed State function now supports a list of templates. This is particularly useful when a very large Jinja template is split into multiple smaller and easier to read templates that can eventually be reused in other States. For example, the following syntax is not correct to manage the configuration of NTP and BGP simultaneously, using two different templates and changing the device configuration through one single commit:

manage_bgp_and_ntp:
  netconfig.managed:
    - template_name:
        - salt://templates/bgp.jinja
        - salt://templates/ntp.jinja
    - context:
        bpg: {{ pillar.bgp }}
        ntp: {{ pillar.ntp }}

Connection Re-establishment on Demand

Beginning with this release, any NAPALM command executed when running under a NAPALM Proxy Minion supports the force_reconnect magic argument.

Proxy Minions generally establish a connection with the remote network device at the time of the Minion startup and that connection is going to be used forever.

If one would need to execute a command on the device but is connecting using different parameters (due to various causes, e.g., unable to authenticate the user specified in the Pillar as the authentication system - say TACACS+ is not available, or the DNS resolver is currently down and would like to temporarily use the IP address instead, etc.), it implies updating the Pillar data and restarting the Proxy Minion process restart. In particular cases like that, you can pass the force_reconnect=True keyword argument, together with the alternative connection details, to enforce the command to be executed over a separate connection.

For example, if the usual command is salt '*' net.arp, you can use the following to connect using a different username instead:

salt '*' net.arp username=my-alt-usr force_reconnect=True

The same goes with any of the other configuration arguments required for the NAPALM connection - see NAPALM proxy documentation.

Configuration Replace Features

To replace various configuration chunks, you can use the new net.replace_pattern execution function, or the netconfig.replace_pattern State function. For example, if you want to update your configuration and rename a BGP policy referenced in many places, you can do so by running:

salt '*' net.replace_pattern OLD-POLICY-CONFIG new-policy-config

Similarly, you can also replace entire configuration blocks using the net.blockreplace function.

Configuration Save Features

The net.save_config function can be used to save the configuration of the managed device into a file. For the State subsystem, the netconfig.saved function has been added which provides a complete list of facilities when managing the target file where the configuration of the network device can be saved.

For example, backup the running configuration of each device under its own directory tree:

/var/backups/{{ opts.id }}/running.cfg:
  netconfig.saved:
    - source: running
    - makedirs: true

All the new network automation modules mentioned above are directly exposed to the NAPALM users, without requiring any architectural changes, just eventually install some requirements:

Junos

The features from the existing junos Execution Module are available via the following functions:

  • napalm.junos_cli: Execute a CLI command and return the output as text or Python dictionary.

  • napalm.junos_rpc: Execute an RPC request on the remote Junos device, and return the result as a Python dictionary, easy to digest and manipulate.

  • napalm.junos_install_os: Install the given image on the device.

  • napalm.junos_facts: The complete list of Junos facts collected by the junos-eznc underlying library.

Note

To be able to use these features, you muse ensure that you meet the requirements for the junos module. As junos-eznc is already a dependency of NAPALM, you will only have to install jxmlease.

Usage examples:

salt '*' napalm.junos_cli 'show arp' format=xml
salt '*' napalm.junos_rpc get-interface-information
Netmiko

The features from the newly added netmiko Execution Module are available as:

  • napalm.netmiko_commands: Execute one or more commands to be execute on the remote device, via Netmiko, and return the output as a text.

  • napalm.netmiko_config: Load a list of configuration command on the remote device, via Netmiko. The commands can equally be loaded from a local or remote path, and passed through Salt's template rendering pipeline (by default using Jinja as the template rendering engine).

Usage examples:

salt '*' napalm.netmiko_commands 'show version' 'show interfaces'
salt '*' napalm.netmiko_config config_file=https://bit.ly/2sgljCB
Arista pyeapi

For various operations and various extension modules, the following features have been added to gate functionality from the pyeapi module:

Usage examples:

salt '*' napalm.pyeapi_run_commands 'show version' 'show interfaces'
salt '*' napalm.pyeapi_config config_file=salt://path/to/template.jinja
Cisco NX-API

In the exact same way as above, the user has absolute control by using the following primitives to manage Cisco Nexus switches via the NX-API:

  • napalm.nxos_api_show: Execute one or more show (non-configuration) commands, and return the output as plain text or Python dictionary.

  • napalm.nxos_api_rpc: Execute arbitrary RPC requests via the Nexus API.

  • napalm.nxos_api_config: Configures the Nexus switch with the specified commands, via the NX-API. The commands can be loaded from the command line, or a local or remote file, eventually rendered using the templating engine of choice (default: jinja).

Usage examples:

salt '*' napalm.nxos_api_show 'show bgp sessions' 'show processes' raw_text=False
Ciscoconfparse

The following list of function may be handy when manipulating Cisco IOS or Junos style configurations:

  • napalm.config_filter_lines: Return a list of detailed matches, for the configuration blocks (parent-child relationship) whose parent and children respect the regular expressions provided.

  • napalm.config_find_lines: Return the configuration lines that match the regular expression provided.

  • napalm.config_lines_w_child: Return the configuration lines that match a regular expression, having child lines matching the child regular expression.

  • napalm.config_lines_wo_child: Return the configuration lines that match a regular expression, that don't have child lines matching the child regular expression.

Note

These functions require the ciscoconfparse Python library to be installed.

Usage example (find interfaces that are administratively shut down):

salt '*' napalm.config_lines_w_child 'interface' 'shutdown'
IOSConfig

For Cisco IOS style configuration, the following features have been added to the napalm Execution Module:

  • napalm.config_tree: Transform Cisco IOS style configuration to structured Python dictionary, using the configuration of the interrogated network device.

  • napalm.config_merge_tree: Return the merge tree of the configuration of the managed network device with a different configuration to be merged with (without actually loading any changes on the device).

  • napalm.config_merge_text: Return the merge result (as text) of the configuration of the managed network device with a different configuration to be merged with.

  • napalm.config_merge_diff: Return the merge diff after merging the configuration of the managed network device with a different configuration (without actually loading any changes on the device).

SCP

Reusing the already available connection credentials provided for NAPALM, the following features are now available:

  • napalm.scp_put: Transfer files and directories to remote network device.

  • napalm.scp_get: Transfer files and directories from remote network device to the localhost of the Minion.

PeeringDB

The peeringdb Execution Module is useful to gather information about other networks you can potentially peer with, and automatically establish BGP sessions, e.g., given just a specific AS number, the rest of the data (i.e., IP addresses, locations where the remote network is available, etc.) is retrieved from PeeringDB, and the session configuration is automated with minimal to no effort (typing the IP addresses manually can be both tedious and error prone).

New Docker Proxy Minion

Docker containers can now be treated as actual minions without installing salt in the container, using the new docker proxy minion.

This proxy minion uses the docker executor to pass commands to the docker container using docker.call. Any state module calls are passed through the corresponding function from the docker module.

proxy:
  proxytype: docker
  name: keen_proskuriakova

Terraform Salt-SSH Roster

You can now dynamically generate a Salt-SSH roster from the terraform resources defined with terraform-provider-salt.

This allows you to combine both terraform and Salt-SSH to provision and configure your hosts. See the terraform roster for an example on how to setup and use.

Grains Dictionary Passed into Custom Grains

Starting in this release, if a custom grains function accepts a variable named grains, the Grains dictionary of the already compiled grains will be passed in. Because of the non-deterministic order that grains are rendered in, the only grains that can be relied upon to be passed in are core.py grains, since those are compiled first.

More Precise virtual Grain

This release improves the accuracy of the virtual grain when running Salt in a nested virtualization environment (e.g. systemd-nspawn container inside a VM) and having virt-what installed.

Until now, the virtual grain was determined by matching against all output lines of virt-what instead of individual items which could lead to not quite precise results (e.g. reporting HyperV inside a systemd-nspawn container running within a Hyper-V-based VM.

Configurable Module Environment

Salt modules (states, execution modules, returners, etc.) now can have custom environment variables applied when running shell commands. This can be configured by setting a system-environment key either in Grains or Pillar. The syntax is as follows:

system-environment:
  <type>
    <module>:
      # Namespace for all functions in the module
      _:
        <key>: <value>

      # Namespace only for particular function in the module
      <function>:
        <key>: <value>
  • <type> would be the type of module (i.e. states, modules, etc.).

  • <module> would be the module's name.

    Note

    The module name can be either the virtual name (e.g. pkg), or the physical name (e.g. yumpkg).

  • <function> would be the function name within that module. To apply environment variables to all functions in a given module, use an underscore (i.e. _) as the function name. For example, to set the same environment variable for all package management functions, the following could be used:

    system-environment:
      modules:
        pkg:
          _:
            SOMETHING: for_all
    

    To set an environment variable in pkg.install only:

    system-environment:
      modules:
        pkg:
          install:
            LC_ALL: en_GB.UTF-8
    

    To set the same variable but only for SUSE minions (which use zypper for package management):

    system-environment:
      modules:
        zypper:
          install:
            LC_ALL: en_GB.UTF-8
    

Note

This is not supported throughout Salt; the module must explicitly support this feature (though this may change in the future). As of this release, the only modules which support this are the following pkg virtual modules:

"Virtual Package" Support Dropped for APT

In APT, some packages have an associated list of packages which they provide. This allows one to do things like run apt-get install foo when the real package name is foo1.0, and get the right package installed.

Salt has traditionally designated as "virtual packages" those which are provided by an installed package, but for which there is no real package by that name installed. Given the above example, if one were to run a pkg.installed state for a package named foo, then pkg.list_pkgs would show a package version of simply 1 for package foo, denoting that it is a virtual package.

However, while this makes certain aspects of package management convenient, there are issues with this approach that make relying on "virtual packages" problematic. For instance, Ubuntu has four different mutually-conflicting packages for nginx:

All four of these provide nginx. Yet there is an nginx package as well, which has no actual content and merely has dependencies on any one of the above four packages. If one used nginx in a pkg.installed state, and none of the above four packages were installed, then the nginx metapackage would be installed, which would pull in nginx-core_. Later, if nginx were used in a pkg.removed state, the nginx metapackage would be removed, leaving nginx-core installed. The result would be that, since nginx-core_ provides nginx_, Salt would now see nginx as an installed virtual package, and the pkg.removed state would fail. Moreover, nginx would not actually have been removed, since nginx-core would remain installed.

Starting with this release, Salt will no longer support using "virtual package" names in pkg states, and package names will need to be specified using the proper package name. The pkg.list_repo_pkgs function can be used to find matching package names in the repositories, given a package name (or glob):

# salt myminion pkg.list_repo_pkgs 'nginx*'
myminion:
    ----------
    nginx:
        - 1.10.3-0ubuntu0.16.04.2
        - 1.9.15-0ubuntu1
    nginx-common:
        - 1.10.3-0ubuntu0.16.04.2
        - 1.9.15-0ubuntu1
    nginx-core:
        - 1.10.3-0ubuntu0.16.04.2
        - 1.9.15-0ubuntu1
    nginx-core-dbg:
        - 1.10.3-0ubuntu0.16.04.2
        - 1.9.15-0ubuntu1
    nginx-doc:
        - 1.10.3-0ubuntu0.16.04.2
        - 1.9.15-0ubuntu1
    nginx-extras:
        - 1.10.3-0ubuntu0.16.04.2
        - 1.9.15-0ubuntu1
    nginx-extras-dbg:
        - 1.10.3-0ubuntu0.16.04.2
        - 1.9.15-0ubuntu1
    nginx-full:
        - 1.10.3-0ubuntu0.16.04.2
        - 1.9.15-0ubuntu1
    nginx-full-dbg:
        - 1.10.3-0ubuntu0.16.04.2
        - 1.9.15-0ubuntu1
    nginx-light:
        - 1.10.3-0ubuntu0.16.04.2
        - 1.9.15-0ubuntu1
    nginx-light-dbg:
        - 1.10.3-0ubuntu0.16.04.2
        - 1.9.15-0ubuntu1

Alternatively, the newly-added pkg.show function can be used to get more detailed information about a given package and help determine what package name is correct:

# salt myminion pkg.show 'nginx*' filter=description,provides
myminion:
    ----------
    nginx:
        ----------
        1.10.3-0ubuntu0.16.04.2:
            ----------
            Description:
                small, powerful, scalable web/proxy server
        1.9.15-0ubuntu1:
            ----------
            Description:
                small, powerful, scalable web/proxy server
    nginx-common:
        ----------
        1.10.3-0ubuntu0.16.04.2:
            ----------
            Description:
                small, powerful, scalable web/proxy server - common files
        1.9.15-0ubuntu1:
            ----------
            Description:
                small, powerful, scalable web/proxy server - common files
    nginx-core:
        ----------
        1.10.3-0ubuntu0.16.04.2:
            ----------
            Description:
                nginx web/proxy server (core version)
            Provides:
                httpd, httpd-cgi, nginx
        1.9.15-0ubuntu1:
            ----------
            Description:
                nginx web/proxy server (core version)
            Provides:
                httpd, httpd-cgi, nginx
    nginx-core-dbg:
        ----------
        1.10.3-0ubuntu0.16.04.2:
            ----------
            Description:
                nginx web/proxy server (core version) - debugging symbols
        1.9.15-0ubuntu1:
            ----------
            Description:
                nginx web/proxy server (core version) - debugging symbols
    nginx-doc:
        ----------
        1.10.3-0ubuntu0.16.04.2:
            ----------
            Description:
                small, powerful, scalable web/proxy server - documentation
        1.9.15-0ubuntu1:
            ----------
            Description:
                small, powerful, scalable web/proxy server - documentation
    nginx-extras:
        ----------
        1.10.3-0ubuntu0.16.04.2:
            ----------
            Description:
                nginx web/proxy server (extended version)
            Provides:
                httpd, httpd-cgi, nginx
        1.9.15-0ubuntu1:
            ----------
            Description:
                nginx web/proxy server (extended version)
            Provides:
                httpd, httpd-cgi, nginx
    nginx-extras-dbg:
        ----------
        1.10.3-0ubuntu0.16.04.2:
            ----------
            Description:
                nginx web/proxy server (extended version) - debugging symbols
        1.9.15-0ubuntu1:
            ----------
            Description:
                nginx web/proxy server (extended version) - debugging symbols
    nginx-full:
        ----------
        1.10.3-0ubuntu0.16.04.2:
            ----------
            Description:
                nginx web/proxy server (standard version)
            Provides:
                httpd, httpd-cgi, nginx
        1.9.15-0ubuntu1:
            ----------
            Description:
                nginx web/proxy server (standard version)
            Provides:
                httpd, httpd-cgi, nginx
    nginx-full-dbg:
        ----------
        1.10.3-0ubuntu0.16.04.2:
            ----------
            Description:
                nginx web/proxy server (standard version) - debugging symbols
        1.9.15-0ubuntu1:
            ----------
            Description:
                nginx web/proxy server (standard version) - debugging symbols
    nginx-light:
        ----------
        1.10.3-0ubuntu0.16.04.2:
            ----------
            Description:
                nginx web/proxy server (basic version)
            Provides:
                httpd, httpd-cgi, nginx
        1.9.15-0ubuntu1:
            ----------
            Description:
                nginx web/proxy server (basic version)
            Provides:
                httpd, httpd-cgi, nginx
    nginx-light-dbg:
        ----------
        1.10.3-0ubuntu0.16.04.2:
            ----------
            Description:
                nginx web/proxy server (basic version) - debugging symbols
        1.9.15-0ubuntu1:
            ----------
            Description:
                nginx web/proxy server (basic version) - debugging symbols

Minion Startup Events

When a minion starts up it sends a notification on the event bus with a tag that looks like this: salt/minion/<minion_id>/start. For historical reasons the minion also sends a similar event with an event tag like this: minion_start. This duplication can cause a lot of clutter on the event bus when there are many minions. Set enable_legacy_startup_events: False in the minion config to ensure only the salt/minion/<minion_id>/start events are sent.

The new enable_legacy_startup_events minion config option defaults to True, but will be set to default to False beginning with the Sodium release of Salt.

The Salt Syndic currently sends an old style syndic_start event as well. The syndic respects enable_legacy_startup_events as well.

Failhard changes

It is now possible to override a global failhard setting with a state-level failhard setting. This is most useful in case where global failhard is set to True and you want the execution not to stop for a specific state that could fail, by setting the state level failhard to False. This also allows for the use of onfail*-requisites, which would previously be ignored when a global failhard was set to True. This is a deviation from previous behavior, where the global failhard setting always resulted in an immediate stop whenever any state failed (regardless of whether the failing state had a failhard setting of its own, or whether any onfail*-requisites were used).

Pass Through Options to file.serialize State

This allows for more granular control over the way in which the dataset is serialized. See the documentation for the new serializer_opts and deserializer_opts options in the file.serialize state for more information.

file.patch State Rewritten

The file.patch state has been rewritten with several new features:

  • Patch sources can now be remote files instead of only salt:// URLs

  • Multi-file patches are now supported

  • Patch files can be templated

In addition, it is no longer necessary to specify what the hash of the patched file should be.

New no_proxy Minion Configuration

Pass a list of hosts using the no_proxy minion config option to bypass an HTTP proxy.

Note

This key does nothing unless proxy_host is configured and it does not support any kind of wildcards.

no_proxy: [ '127.0.0.1', 'foo.tld' ]

Changes to slack Engine

The output returned to Slack from functions run using this engine is now formatted using that function's proper outputter. Earlier releases would format the output in YAML for all functions except for when states were run.

Enhancements to wtmp Beacon

A new key, action, has been added to the events fired by this beacon, which will contain either the string login or logout. This will simplify reactors which use this beacon's data, as it will no longer be necessary to check the integer value of the type key to know whether the event is a login or logout.

Additionally, in the event that your platform has a non-standard utmp.h, you can now configure which type numbers indicate a login and logout.

See the wtmp beacon documentation for more information.

Deprecated and removed options

API removed arguments

Support for LocalClient's expr_form argument has been removed. Please use tgt_type instead. This change was made due to numerous reports of confusion among community members, since the targeting method is published to minions as tgt_type, and appears as tgt_type in the job cache as well.

Those who are using the LocalClient (either directly, or implicitly via a netapi module) need to update their code to use tgt_type.

>>> import salt.client
>>> local = salt.client.LocalClient()
>>> local.cmd('*', 'cmd.run', ['whoami'], tgt_type='glob')
{'jerry': 'root'}

Minion Configuration deprecated option

The master_shuffle configuration option is deprecated as of the 2019.2.0 release. Please use the random_master option instead.

Module removed options

  • The napalm_network module has been changed as follows:

    • Support for the template_path has been removed from net.load_template function. This is because support for NAPALM native templates has been dropped.

  • The pip module has been changed as follows:

    • Support for the no_chown option has been removed from pip.install function.

  • The trafficserver module has been changed as follows:

  • The win_update module has been removed. It has been replaced by win_wua.

  • The win_wua module has been changed as follows:

    • The win_wua.download_update and win_wua.download_updates functions have been removed. Please use win_wua.download instead.

    • The win_wua.install_update and win_wua.install_updates functions have been removed. Please use win_wua.install instead.

    • The win_wua.list_update function has been removed. Please use functions have been removed. Please use win_wua.get instead.

    • The win_wua.list_updates function has been removed. Please use functions have been removed. Please use win_wua.list instead.

Pillar removed option

  • The vault external pillar has been changed as follows:

    • Support for the profile argument was removed. Any options passed up until and following the first path= are discarded.

Roster removed option

  • The cache roster has been changed as follows:

    • Support for roster_order as a list or tuple has been removed. As of the 2019.2.0 release, roster_order must be a dictionary.

    • The roster_order option now includes IPv6 in addition to IPv4 for the private, public, global or local settings. The syntax for these settings has changed to ipv4-* or ipv6-*, respectively.

State removed modules and options

Utils removed options

The cloud utils module had the following changes:

  • Support for the cache_nodes_ip function in salt utils module has been removed. The function was incomplete and non-functional.

The vault utils module had the following changes:

  • Support for specifying Vault connection data within a 'profile' has been removed. Please see the vault execution module documentation for details on the new configuration schema.

Dependency Deprecations

Salt-Cloud has been updated to use the pypsexec Python library instead of the winexe executable. Both winexe and pypsexec run remote commands against Windows OSes. Since winexe is not packaged for every system, it has been deprecated in favor of pypsexec.

Salt-Cloud has deprecated the use impacket in favor of smbprotocol. This changes was made because impacket is not compatible with Python 3.

SaltSSH major updates

SaltSSH now works across different major Python versions. Python 2.7 ~ Python 3.x are now supported transparently. Requirement is, however, that the SaltMaster should have installed Salt, including all related dependencies for Python 2 and Python 3. Everything needs to be importable from the respective Python environment.

SaltSSH can bundle up an arbitrary version of Salt. If there would be an old box for example, running an outdated and unsupported Python 2.6, it is still possible from a SaltMaster with Python 3.5 or newer to access it. This feature requires an additional configuration in /etc/salt/master as follows:

ssh_ext_alternatives:
    2016.3:                     # Namespace, can be actually anything.
        py-version: [2, 6]      # Constraint to specific interpreter version
        path: /opt/2016.3/salt  # Main Salt installation
        dependencies:           # List of dependencies and their installation paths
          jinja2: /opt/jinja2
          yaml: /opt/yaml
          tornado: /opt/tornado
          msgpack: /opt/msgpack
          certifi: /opt/certifi
          singledispatch: /opt/singledispatch.py
          singledispatch_helpers: /opt/singledispatch_helpers.py
          markupsafe: /opt/markupsafe
          backports_abc: /opt/backports_abc.py

It is also possible to use several alternative versions of Salt. You can for instance generate a minimal tarball using runners and include that. But this is only possible, when such specific Salt version is also available on the Master machine, although does not need to be directly installed together with the older Python interpreter.

SaltSSH now support private key's passphrase. You can configure it by:

  • --priv-passwd for salt-ssh cli

  • salt_priv_passwd for salt master configure file

  • priv_passwd for salt roster file

State Module Changes

salt State Module (used in orchestration)

The test option now defaults to None. A value of True or False set here is passed to the state being run and can be used to override a test: True option set in the minion's config file. In previous releases the minion's config option would take precedence and it would be impossible to run an orchestration on a minion with test mode set to True in the config file.

If a minion is not in permanent test mode due to the config file and the 'test' argument here is left as None then a value of test=True on the command-line is passed correctly to the minion to run an orchestration in test mode. At present it is not possible to pass test=False on the command-line to override a minion in permanent test mode and so the test: False option must still be set in the orchestration file.

event.send State

The event.send state does not know the results of the sent event, so returns changed every state run. It can now be set to return changed or unchanged.

influxdb_user.present Influxdb User Module State

The password parameter has been changed to passwd to remove the name collusion with the influxdb client configuration (client_kwargs) allowing management of users when authentication is enabled on the influxdb instance

Old behavior:

influxdb_user.present:
  - name: exampleuser
  - password: exampleuserpassword
  - user: admin
  - password: adminpassword

New behavior:

influxdb_user.present:
  - name: exampleuser
  - passwd: exampleuserpassword
  - user: admin
  - password: adminpassword

winrepo_cache_expire_min Windows Package Definitions Caching

The winrepo_cache_expire_min has been changed from 0 to 1800 (30 minutes) For example if you run highstate the package definitions are normally updated, however now if the package definitions are younger than winrepo_cache_expire_min (30 minutes) the package definitions will not be refreshed, reducing the amount of time taken to run a 2nd highstate. To get the old behaviour change the value back to 0 in the minion configuration file. This also effects the behaviour of other functions which default to refresh. The pkg.refresh_db will always refresh the package definitions.

LDAP External Authentication

freeipa groupattribute support

Previously, if Salt was using external authentication against a freeipa LDAP system it could only search for users via the accountattributename field. This release add an additional search using the groupattribute field as well. The original accountattributename search is done first then the groupattribute allowing for backward compatibility with previous Salt releases.

Jinja Include Relative Paths

When a jinja include template name begins with ./ or ../ then the import will be relative to the importing file.

Prior practices required the following construct:

{% from tpldir ~ '/foo' import bar %}

A more "natural" construct is now supported:

{% from './foo' import bar %}

Comparatively when importing from a parent directory - prior practice:

{% from tpldir ~ '/../foo' import bar %}

New style for including from a parent directory:

{% from '../foo' import bar %}

salt-api

salt-api Windows support

Previously, salt-api was was not supported on the Microsoft Windows platforms. Now it is! salt-api provides a RESTful interface to a running Salt system. It allows for viewing minions, runners, and jobs as well as running execution modules and runners of a running Salt system through a REST API that returns JSON. See Salt-API documentation. .. _Salt-API: https://docs.saltstack.com/en/latest/topics/netapi/index.html

Logging Changes

Include Job ID (JID) in Minion and Master Logs

The Job ID (JID) can now be optionally included in both the minion and master logs by including jid in either the log_fmt_console or log_fmt_logfile configuration option:

log_fmt_console: "[%(levelname)-8s] %(jid)s %(message)s"

The will cause the JID to be included in any log entries that are related to a particular Salt job. The JID will be included using the default format, [JID: %(jid)s] but can be overriden with the log_fmt_jid configuration item.

log_fmt_jid: "[JID: %(jid)s]"

Security

Windows runas changes

A password is no longer required with runas under normal circumstances. The password option is only needed if the minion process is run under a restricted (non-administrator) account. In the aforementioned case, a password is only required when using the runas argument to run command as a different user.