Logging

The salt project tries to get the logging to work for you and help us solve any issues you might find along the way.

If you want to get some more information on the nitty-gritty of salt's logging system, please head over to the logging development document, if all you're after is salt's logging configurations, please continue reading.

Log Levels

The log levels are ordered numerically such that setting the log level to a specific level will record all log statements at that level and higher. For example, setting log_level: error will log statements at error, critical, and quiet levels, although nothing should be logged at quiet level.

Most of the logging levels are defined by default in Python's logging library and can be found in the official Python documentation. Salt uses some more levels in addition to the standard levels. All levels available in salt are shown in the table below.

Note

Python dependencies used by salt may define and use additional logging levels. For example, the Python 2 version of the multiprocessing standard Python library uses the levels subwarning, 25 and subdebug, 5.

Level Numeric value Description
quiet 1000 Nothing should be logged at this level
critical 50 Critical errors
error 40 Errors
warning 30 Warnings
info 20 Normal log information
profile 15 Profiling information on salt performance
debug 10 Information useful for debugging both salt implementations and salt code
trace 5 More detailed code debugging information
garbage 1 Even more debugging information
all 0 Everything

Available Configuration Settings

log_file

The log records can be sent to a regular file, local path name, or network location. Remote logging works best when configured to use rsyslogd(8) (e.g.: file:///dev/log), with rsyslogd(8) configured for network logging. The format for remote addresses is: <file|udp|tcp>://<host|socketpath>:<port-if-required>/<log-facility>. Where log-facility is the symbolic name of a syslog facility as defined in the SysLogHandler documentation . It defaults to LOG_USER.

Default: Dependent of the binary being executed, for example, for salt-master, /var/log/salt/master.

Examples:

log_file: /var/log/salt/master
log_file: /var/log/salt/minion
log_file: file:///dev/log
log_file: file:///dev/log/LOG_DAEMON
log_file: udp://loghost:10514

log_level

Default: warning

The level of log record messages to send to the console. One of all, garbage, trace, debug, profile, info, warning, error, critical, quiet.

log_level: warning

Note

Add log_level: quiet in salt configuration file to completely disable logging. In case of running salt in command line use --log-level=quiet instead.

log_level_logfile

Default: info

The level of messages to send to the log file. One of all, garbage, trace, debug, profile, info, warning, error, critical, quiet.

log_level_logfile: warning

log_datefmt

Default: %H:%M:%S

The date and time format used in console log messages. Allowed date/time formatting can be seen on time.strftime.

log_datefmt: '%H:%M:%S'

log_datefmt_logfile

Default: %Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S

The date and time format used in log file messages. Allowed date/time formatting can be seen on time.strftime.

log_datefmt_logfile: '%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S'

log_fmt_console

Default: [%(levelname)-8s] %(message)s

The format of the console logging messages. All standard python logging LogRecord attributes can be used. Salt also provides these custom LogRecord attributes to colorize console log output:

'%(colorlevel)s'   # log level name colorized by level
'%(colorname)s'    # colorized module name
'%(colorprocess)s' # colorized process number
'%(colormsg)s'     # log message colorized by level

Note

The %(colorlevel)s, %(colorname)s, and %(colorprocess) LogRecord attributes also include padding and enclosing brackets, [ and ] to match the default values of their collateral non-colorized LogRecord attributes.

log_fmt_console: '[%(levelname)-8s] %(message)s'

log_fmt_logfile

Default: %(asctime)s,%(msecs)03d [%(name)-17s][%(levelname)-8s] %(message)s

The format of the log file logging messages. All standard python logging LogRecord attributes can be used. Salt also provides these custom LogRecord attributes that include padding and enclosing brackets [ and ]:

'%(bracketlevel)s'   # equivalent to [%(levelname)-8s]
'%(bracketname)s'    # equivalent to [%(name)-17s]
'%(bracketprocess)s' # equivalent to [%(process)5s]
log_fmt_logfile: '%(asctime)s,%(msecs)03d [%(name)-17s][%(levelname)-8s] %(message)s'

log_granular_levels

Default: {}

This can be used to control logging levels more specifically. The example sets the main salt library at the 'warning' level, but sets salt.modules to log at the debug level:

log_granular_levels:
  'salt': 'warning'
  'salt.modules': 'debug'

External Logging Handlers

Besides the internal logging handlers used by salt, there are some external which can be used, see the external logging handlers document.